Globalists Planning to Assassinate Trump


CNN counterterrorism analyst Phil Mudd warned that President Trump is agitating the government, saying during a Thursday afternoon interview with CNN anchor Jake Tapper that the U.S. government “is going to kill this guy.”

Mudd, who served as deputy director to former FBI Director Robert Mueller, said Trump’s defense of Russian President Vladimir Putin has compelled federal employees “at Langley, Foggy Bottom, CIA and State” to try to take Trump down.

“Let me give you one bottom line as a former government official. Government is going to kill this guy,” Mudd, a staunch critic of Trump, said on “The Lead.”

the Hill

Stocks Drop Illustrate Mueller Gunning For Trump Using Flynn on Turkey Mistake

Stocks finished lower on Friday after a report that Michael Flynn was directed by President Trump to talk to Russians sent investors on a wild ride.

ABC News reported that Flynn, the former national security adviser, would testify that he was directed to make contact with Russians during the presidential campaign in 2016. Flynn pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about his postelection contacts with Russia’s ambassador to the U.S.

CNBC

Trump Blamed For White House Repairs


Apparently, the White House really is a dump — with work orders showing reports of mice and cockroach infestations in the West Wing, broken toilet seats in the Oval Office and numerous other problems.

The documents, obtained by NBC4 Washington, were made public this week just months after President Trump reportedly criticized the shape that it was left in by the previous administration.

“That White House is a real dump,” he said, according to Golf magazine.

While the president later denied the comment, it turns out there really are loads of issues plaguing the historic structure.

NYP

Fake Media Pushing ‘Sex is Rape’ Narrative To Confuse Snowflakes

When it comes to having sex, consent is crucial. While that may seem obvious, a new study in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence reveals that some men perceive a woman’s interest in them as consent for sex, misinterpreting a woman’s sexual intentions.

It may sound like splitting hairs, but there’s a difference between being interested in having sex with someone (sexual interest) and actually deciding to act on that desire (consent to sex). The problem, according to the new research, is that some men have difficulty differentiating between the two.

Yahoo UK

‘Sexy’ Childrens’ Dress Sold in Australia


A popular Australian online shopping site has caused outrage after advertising a dress for little girls with a slogan some parents say “sexualizes children’s clothing.”

Displaying the words “I’m sexy and I know it,” Ozsale listed the dress as being “beautifully designed clothing for your little one.

The dress, sold in sizes for kids aged 3 to 9 years, was spotted by a Facebook group called “Let clothes be clothes” and drew immediate criticism from concerned parents.

Yahoo

San Francisco Rescinds Legal $90,000 Sale To Correct Own Mistake


SAN FRANCISCO — Tina Lam is an engineer with an engineer’s salary. She can’t afford to live on Presidio Terrace — one of the most exclusive streets in San Francisco — but she could buy the street.

In 2015, the City of San Francisco put the parcel up for sale after the homeowners’ association failed to pay property taxes on the street for more than a decade. Lam and her husband, Michael Cheng, paid $90,000 in an online auction to become the proud owners of the street, the sidewalks, and the well-manicured shrubbery around the 35 mega-mansions on Presidio Terrace. On Monday, the couple offered to sell it all back to residents for nearly $1 million.

Now, city leaders are moving to rescind the sale. On November 28, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors determined that the city’s tax collector did not make a reasonable effort to notify residents of the unpaid tax bill before awarding their street to the highest bidder — and voted to reverse the sale. Lam and Cheng will be reimbursed their $90,000.

Business Insider

Kate Steinle’s Illegal Immigrant Killer Walks


San Francisco jurors found Jose Ines Garcia Zarate not guilty in the killing of Kate Steinle in the trial that provoked a national debate over illegal immigration.

The jurors reached their verdict late Thursday in the sixth day of deliberations after receiving the case last week. The question at hand for the jury was whether Steinle’s death was a murder or an accident.

They decided the latter.

The accused Zarate was deported five times and was wanted for a sixth deportation from the United States when he fatally shot Steinle in the back in 2015 on a San Francisco pier. Zarate didn’t deny shooting Steinle, but claimed it was an accident. The killer had seven felony convictions on record.

Dangerous

IRS Laughs At Digital Currencies, Still Wants a Piece


Most digital currencies exist in a sort of twilight state just beyond the grasp of federal regulators, but the U.S. tax authority is starting to get savvy to this whole bitcoin thing.
<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="On Wednesday, a federal judge in San Francisco ruled that Coinbase must supply the IRS with identifying information on users who had more than $20,000 in annual transactions on its platform between 2013 and 2015.&nbsp;After noticing that the number of tax returns claiming gains from virtual currency didn't line up with the emerging popularity of digital currencies like bitcoin as an investment vehicle, the IRS asked Coinbase to hand over a broad swath of information on its users. Coinbase pushed back, and now the court has landed on a compromise that the company is calling a "partial victory."” data-reactid=”31″ style=”margin: 0.8em 0px 0px; color: rgb(38, 40, 42); font-family: "Helvetica Neue", Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 15px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);”>On Wednesday, a federal judge in San Francisco ruled that Coinbase must supply the IRS with identifying information on users who had more than $20,000 in annual transactions on its platform between 2013 and 2015. After noticing that the number of tax returns claiming gains from virtual currency didn’t line up with the emerging popularity of digital currencies like bitcoin as an investment vehicle, the IRS asked Coinbase to hand over a broad swath of information on its users. Coinbase pushed back, and now the court has landed on a compromise that the company is calling a “partial victory.”

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="On Wednesday, a federal judge in San Francisco ruled that Coinbase must supply the IRS with identifying information on users who had more than $20,000 in annual transactions on its platform between 2013 and 2015.&nbsp;After noticing that the number of tax returns claiming gains from virtual currency didn't line up with the emerging popularity of digital currencies like bitcoin as an investment vehicle, the IRS asked Coinbase to hand over a broad swath of information on its users. Coinbase pushed back, and now the court has landed on a compromise that the company is calling a "partial victory."” data-reactid=”31″ style=”margin: 0.8em 0px 0px; color: rgb(38, 40, 42); font-family: "Helvetica Neue", Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 15px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);”>Tech Crunch

Moody’s Threatens Cities That Don’t Adopt Global Warming Dogma


Coastal communities from Maine to California have been put on notice from one of the top credit rating agencies: Start preparing for climate change or risk losing access to cheap credit.

In a report to its clients Tuesday, Moody’s Investors Service Inc. explained how it incorporates climate change into its credit ratings for state and local bonds. If cities and states don’t deal with risks from surging seas or intense storms, they are at greater risk of default.

Chicago Tribune